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‘13 Stryker
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I always use waterless wash. Takes longer to clean the bike. Drink another beer. Sit. Clean more. Have another beer.
Your suppose to drink a beer or three first then start, have you not learned anything from Miko??:thumb:

BTW- I've only washed my bike with hose and soap four times since new in 2014. However the wheels I wash much more often, just can't find a product that will repel brake dust and I dislike having dirty wheels and a clean bike. I am know as a fair weather rider, I don't intentionally ride in rain, but have been caught in a few huge downpours. I use S100 on mostly everything but the chrome/wheels- dirt and grime seem to not stick very good to that stuff.
 

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I must be the oddball. Wash when I can with regular car soap and the hose. Use my leaf blower to dry and then finish with microfiber clothes.

IMHO, the bike can get wet without issue as long as you don't purposely spray water into connectors, the intake etc. And obviously not when hot after a ride(either method there) and don't use a pressure washer but again I wouldn't do that to my car either.

Doesn't get washed enough but been doing it this way since 2012 and have been caught in the rain a fair number of times even though I try and avoid it. Bike is fine.
 

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F11 TopCoat is the best i've used... it is rather pricey, but has drastically reduced my cleaning time. I no longer wash and wax... and only use a sponge with a bit of water / soap on the really stuck on bugs... but even that is rare since the F11 prevents them from really sticking. https://topcoat.store/
 

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I use a waterless cleaner with wax from the local Canadian Tire automotive section. Works very well. Then I go over the bike with ACF-50 to keep away the corrosion.

One thing I notice with waterless wash is that it's super hard to get into all the tiny nooks and crannies to get the gunk out. You need an assortment of brushes and things for sure. You have to spend a long time cleaning. There really isn't anything like water to get into all the tiny spots (both good and bad). I too live in a place with underground parking and no hose, so the waterless works well. A few times a year I find a hose and wash it with light soap, the traditional way, and then the rest of the time I go with the waterless.

For years I used the S100 acid based cleaner that you spray on and rinse off well. It works very well and super quickly, but I'm a bit ambivalent about that sort of cleaner now. Combined with a good douse of ACF-50 that keeps corrosion totally away, but I wouldn't use acid base cleaner without a good corrosion inhibitor.
 

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Preacherman, I use a product called Rejex to keep the brake dust on my wheels easily cleaned. I bought this stuff several years ago and every 6 months I clean my rims and apply this stuff. Let it sit then wipe it off with a micro fiber towel. After it cure's you really notice the brake dust doesn't seem to be as much on there and the stuff that it there wipes off easily. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0006V0LNY/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o05_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
 

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Washing your bike regularly will ensure all your expensive bike parts have a long and happy life. Whether you ride a road bike or a mountain bike, taking the time to wash your bike (especially your drivetrain) is a necessity. For road bikes, we suggest degreasing and "re-greasing" your drivetrain every 100 miles.
 
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