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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can't believe how quick I blasted through the stock rear tire. Only about 5200 miles before it was gone.

I finally got my new rubber in and installed and made a quick mod while I had the wheel off. Which reminds me... does anyone have any tips for getting the rear wheel out of the swingarm? Once I had the axle out I had a **** of a time getting the wheel out because I was getting hung up on the rear caliper. Eventually the caliper fell out, somehow, and I rejoiced but then I ran into the same issue trying to replace the wheel. There has to be a trick to that...

Anyway, some pics for your viewing pleasure:

Fresh rubber ready to get installed


Fresh rubber ready to roll!


While I had the wheel off I decided to hit the rear pulley with a few coats of black spray paint. Why on Earth Yamaha decided to use a silver pulley on the Raven model is beyond me...


Mounted up and ready to ride!



I've only put about 100 miles on the tire so far but it sure seems to fall into the corners much easier. There is also a very noticeable difference in ride height. Can't wait for the temperature to get control of itself so I can go rack up the miles.

EDIT: I forgot to mention that you do indeed have to trim the lower belt guard. I wish I would've thought to snap a shot of how I trimmed it but daylight was fading fast as I was wrapping this project up and wanted to get it together so I could ride to work this morning. I'll try and get a shot in the future.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
SCHIMBO said:
Looks great. Any pics from the rear. It's best to remove the caliper before you remove the wheel.
Yup, can't believe I forgot that, haha. Don't mind the mismatched plate bolts... the stupid little reflector bolts the dealer gave me fell out on my way to work. I managed to find one with my plate but then just grabbed a nut and bolt to replace the other one. Didn't cross my mind at the time to grab two so they matched. Until I took this picture, that is.

 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks. I'm thrilled with how it turned out. You'd be surprised at how much of a difference simply blacking out the circuit board made. That plus a few light coats of spray on tint did wonders.
 

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I get what your saying. My first set of halos had the white circuit board and ever since then I paint the circuit the same color as the vehicle. Makes a world of difference.
 

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When you say noticeable height difference, can you relate that to inches? I would love to put a 240 on mine but am already on the balls of my feet when standing still on level ground. Wondering if the L&M lowering spring will counter the height difference and if so, by how much? Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
That sounds right on the money. I know that I built one of those 4"x8" bike lifts and when I took my rear wheel off I had about an inch of clearance from the ground. When I brought the wheel back with the new tire... it was about an inch too tall. I had to lift the bike and slide a 1"x4" under and it made it the perfect height to roll the wheel in.
 

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Thanks Schimbo, Guess I should have paid more attention in Math class all those years ago. I am having trouble understanding how my axel in the back can go up 2 inches but seat height only 1 inch. With that being the case, sounds like the L&M lowering spring and the 240 Tire should still give me about .5 inch lower than standard stock and keep my stubby legs and feet planted on the groud.
 

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Because the front didn't get raised, just the back. So the part where the tire is is raised the most and it levels out to the front where it is unchanged. Like a incline from front to back.
 
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