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ok.. so vary on my gas mileage. but i tend to just go into any place as long as there is gas. so i take my bike daily to work 15 miles, and some other days i go 40 miles. well i noticed sometimes i dont get the same mileage.

are there any differences with the different grades or the places i put gas (a la walmart cuz its cheaper) to improve my gas mileage?
 

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There's huge differences in brands of fuel. My bike and jeep do the same thing as your bike.
I run reg unleaded and that's what produces the best mileage for me.
Premium isn't filtered any better than regular and may get worse mpg if your motor doesn't need it.
 

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I hear people frequently talking about how sometimes they treat thier car/truck/whatever to premium sometimes because they think it helps. All my cars/truck run on premium but all have been retuned to run on premium. Not only do they perform better with the modified tune I have found that my cost/mile with same driving habits is less with premium/modded tune verse regular/stock tune.

I've been running midgrade on my Stryker and it runs better that when I was using premium. The only time I've got less than 40mpg was when I was running Premium.
 

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Let me add a little fuel to the fire, so to speak. I live in Colorado, and we have 85 octane as our regular grade of gas, and 87 as mid grade. I know that the altitude has something to do with being able to run 85, but wonder what is really better for the bike. I have run both, and the bike really seems to run fine either way. I had been running 87 consistently for the last couple of months. Since installing the cobra auto-tune, air intake and cobra swepts I was noticing my mileage slipping from the low 40's to the high 30's. Now of course there are many variables as to why my fuel mileage may have dropped, such as wanting to twist the throttle a little more with the goodies on it :) On my last fill-up I decided to run a tank of 85. This time I got 42 mpg. Just wondering what the pros and cons of running 85 would be?
 

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Fuel comes in different octane ratings for one reason only. Different burn rates. A higher octane rating means that it burns SLOWER. A higher octane fuel is needed to prevent something called pre-ignition also known as detonation or knock. In a supercharged or turbocharged application a higher octane fuel is almost always required, especially when pushing the vehicle to get the most out of it as far as performance goes. I have a turbocharged car that I run at the racetrack on 116 octane race gas for example.

If you could/were able to advance the timing or your bike/car to get more power out of it, you should consider a higher octane fuel. If not it should run fine on 87 octane.
 

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I just finished my third tank of 87. Had only run 93 and a little 91 in it prior. Bike runs fine and my gas mileage is right in line with what i was getting before. Last tank was 44.7mpg. I dont see a loss/gain in power, mpg, sound etc so im an 87 guy now. thanks guys for the extra 30cents per gallon in my pocket.
 

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imjoesnuffy said:
Fuel comes in different octane ratings for one reason only. Different burn rates. A higher octane rating means that it burns SLOWER. A higher octane fuel is needed to prevent something called pre-ignition also known as detonation or knock. In a supercharged or turbocharged application a higher octane fuel is almost always required, especially when pushing the vehicle to get the most out of it as far as performance goes. I have a turbocharged car that I run at the racetrack on 116 octane race gas for example.

If you could/were able to advance the timing or your bike/car to get more power out of it, you should consider a higher octane fuel. If not it should run fine on 87 octane.
Lets hear more bout this turbo car...
 

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ironman1964 said:
Let me add a little fuel to the fire, so to speak. I live in Colorado, and we have 85 octane as our regular grade of gas, and 87 as mid grade. I know that the altitude has something to do with being able to run 85, but wonder what is really better for the bike. I have run both, and the bike really seems to run fine either way. I had been running 87 consistently for the last couple of months. Since installing the cobra auto-tune, air intake and cobra swepts I was noticing my mileage slipping from the low 40's to the high 30's. Now of course there are many variables as to why my fuel mileage may have dropped, such as wanting to twist the throttle a little more with the goodies on it :) On my last fill-up I decided to run a tank of 85. This time I got 42 mpg. Just wondering what the pros and cons of running 85 would be?

running 85 in the higher elevation is just like running 87 at sea level. Less air in higher elevation so you need a lower ignition temp fuel to ignite thats why you have 85 octane.
 

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Stryker said:
ironman1964 said:
Let me add a little fuel to the fire, so to speak. I live in Colorado, and we have 85 octane as our regular grade of gas, and 87 as mid grade. I know that the altitude has something to do with being able to run 85, but wonder what is really better for the bike. I have run both, and the bike really seems to run fine either way. I had been running 87 consistently for the last couple of months. Since installing the cobra auto-tune, air intake and cobra swepts I was noticing my mileage slipping from the low 40's to the high 30's. Now of course there are many variables as to why my fuel mileage may have dropped, such as wanting to twist the throttle a little more with the goodies on it :) On my last fill-up I decided to run a tank of 85. This time I got 42 mpg. Just wondering what the pros and cons of running 85 would be?

running 85 in the higher elevation is just like running 87 at sea level. Less air in higher elevation so you need a lower ignition temp fuel to ignite thats why you have 85 octane.
Doesn't the Strykers computer controlled fuel injection system adjust automatically for the right ignition temp no mater what octane level fuel your running or altitude your at?
 

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imjoesnuffy said:
Fuel comes in different octane ratings for one reason only. Different burn rates. A higher octane rating means that it burns SLOWER. A higher octane fuel is needed to prevent something called pre-ignition also known as detonation or knock. In a supercharged or turbocharged application a higher octane fuel is almost always required, especially when pushing the vehicle to get the most out of it as far as performance goes. I have a turbocharged car that I run at the racetrack on 116 octane race gas for example.

If you could/were able to advance the timing or your bike/car to get more power out of it, you should consider a higher octane fuel. If not it should run fine on 87 octane.
Octane has nothing to do with how fast the fuel burns... the higher the octane rating the more compression it can have before pre-detonation...
Also it does not increase fuel economy....

Read this from BP:
http://www.powerchipgroup.com/articles/PET0605.pdf

Short version:
FUEL NEWS
INCREASING OCTANE DOES NOT INCREASE POWER
Higher compression and improved engine breathing will increase power. These modifications may lead to detonation or combustion knock which is then eliminated by using fuel with a higher octane.

ALL PETROLEUM BASED FUELS PRODUCE SIMILAR POWER
Petrol refining produces a blend of hundreds of different hydrocarbons that have the required properties to meet the needs of spark ignition engines. It is well recognised that varying the blends has little effect on the power produced in an engine.
 

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SFCMcGan said:
imjoesnuffy said:
Fuel comes in different octane ratings for one reason only. Different burn rates. A higher octane rating means that it burns SLOWER. A higher octane fuel is needed to prevent something called pre-ignition also known as detonation or knock. In a supercharged or turbocharged application a higher octane fuel is almost always required, especially when pushing the vehicle to get the most out of it as far as performance goes. I have a turbocharged car that I run at the racetrack on 116 octane race gas for example.

If you could/were able to advance the timing or your bike/car to get more power out of it, you should consider a higher octane fuel. If not it should run fine on 87 octane.
Octane has nothing to do with how fast the fuel burns... the higher the octane rating the more compression it can have before pre-detonation...
Also it does not increase fuel economy....

Read this from BP:
http://www.powerchipgroup.com/articles/PET0605.pdf

Short version:
FUEL NEWS
INCREASING OCTANE DOES NOT INCREASE POWER
Higher compression and improved engine breathing will increase power. These modifications may lead to detonation or combustion knock which is then eliminated by using fuel with a higher octane.

ALL PETROLEUM BASED FUELS PRODUCE SIMILAR POWER
Petrol refining produces a blend of hundreds of different hydrocarbons that have the required properties to meet the needs of spark ignition engines. It is well recognised that varying the blends has little effect on the power produced in an engine.
Thanks for the informative info but if my ? was answers I missed it or maybe not understood that being do you have to be concerned with octane levels for altitude or any reason with a stock engine that has an electronically controlled fuel injection system pacifically the Stryker?
 

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toby said:
SFCMcGan said:
imjoesnuffy said:
Fuel comes in different octane ratings for one reason only. Different burn rates. A higher octane rating means that it burns SLOWER. A higher octane fuel is needed to prevent something called pre-ignition also known as detonation or knock. In a supercharged or turbocharged application a higher octane fuel is almost always required, especially when pushing the vehicle to get the most out of it as far as performance goes. I have a turbocharged car that I run at the racetrack on 116 octane race gas for example.

If you could/were able to advance the timing or your bike/car to get more power out of it, you should consider a higher octane fuel. If not it should run fine on 87 octane.
Octane has nothing to do with how fast the fuel burns... the higher the octane rating the more compression it can have before pre-detonation...
Also it does not increase fuel economy....

Read this from BP:
http://www.powerchipgroup.com/articles/PET0605.pdf

Short version:
FUEL NEWS
INCREASING OCTANE DOES NOT INCREASE POWER
Higher compression and improved engine breathing will increase power. These modifications may lead to detonation or combustion knock which is then eliminated by using fuel with a higher octane.

ALL PETROLEUM BASED FUELS PRODUCE SIMILAR POWER
Petrol refining produces a blend of hundreds of different hydrocarbons that have the required properties to meet the needs of spark ignition engines. It is well recognised that varying the blends has little effect on the power produced in an engine.
Thanks for the informative info but if my ? was answers I missed it or maybe not understood that being do you have to be concerned with octane levels for altitude or any reason with a stock engine that has an electronically controlled fuel injection system pacifically the Stryker?
No.. compression is compression... fuel injected or carb... higher octane levels do not really come into play until 10.5:1 compression levels... STRYKER is 9.5:1... don't waste money on higher octane fuel... not needed. IF you had a Turbo (I am considering doing this) then it is no longer Naturally asperated... therefor raising compression levels... THEN you need higher octane.

This is from the .GOV site... little better explanation..

http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/pubs/consumer/autos/aut12.shtm

I think I answered the question... let me know if I did or not...
 

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SFCMcGan said:
toby said:
SFCMcGan said:
imjoesnuffy said:
Fuel comes in different octane ratings for one reason only. Different burn rates. A higher octane rating means that it burns SLOWER. A higher octane fuel is needed to prevent something called pre-ignition also known as detonation or knock. In a supercharged or turbocharged application a higher octane fuel is almost always required, especially when pushing the vehicle to get the most out of it as far as performance goes. I have a turbocharged car that I run at the racetrack on 116 octane race gas for example.

If you could/were able to advance the timing or your bike/car to get more power out of it, you should consider a higher octane fuel. If not it should run fine on 87 octane.
Octane has nothing to do with how fast the fuel burns... the higher the octane rating the more compression it can have before pre-detonation...
Also it does not increase fuel economy....

Read this from BP:
http://www.powerchipgroup.com/articles/PET0605.pdf

Short version:
FUEL NEWS
INCREASING OCTANE DOES NOT INCREASE POWER
Higher compression and improved engine breathing will increase power. These modifications may lead to detonation or combustion knock which is then eliminated by using fuel with a higher octane.

ALL PETROLEUM BASED FUELS PRODUCE SIMILAR POWER
Petrol refining produces a blend of hundreds of different hydrocarbons that have the required properties to meet the needs of spark ignition engines. It is well recognised that varying the blends has little effect on the power produced in an engine.
Thanks for the informative info but if my ? was answers I missed it or maybe not understood that being do you have to be concerned with octane levels for altitude or any reason with a stock engine that has an electronically controlled fuel injection system pacifically the Stryker?
No.. compression is compression... fuel injected or carb... higher octane levels do not really come into play until 10.5:1 compression levels... STRYKER is 9.5:1... don't waste money on higher octane fuel... not needed. IF you had a Turbo (I am considering doing this) then it is no longer Naturally asperated... therefor raising compression levels... THEN you need higher octane.

This is from the .GOV site... little better explanation..

http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/pubs/consumer/autos/aut12.shtm

I think I answered the question... let me know if I did or not...
Yes my ? answered thank you very . I will be running regular in my vehicles. My concern was cuz I leave my house a 3,000 ft above sea level 15 miles later I'm at 500 ft and 8 miles later I'm at 4,000 ft and 6 miles later at 100ft above sea level so octane plays no role in how the engine performs through those extremes It's a air fuel mixer, lean or rich thing that the ECFI system on the Stryker automatically adjust. Correct?
 

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Not all high octane burns slowly, you wouldn't know unless you talk to whoever your buying fuel from, renegade here in Topeka says there burns faster than the regular, also completely alcohol free, I don't know much about the auto adjust for ignition temp,


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I don't know much about that all I know is that when I use regular gas I have to refill the tank at about 120 miles and when I use premium gas I refill at about 160 miles I usually refill at costco gas station or BP
 
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